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Sunday, 29th March 2015

in Bee Cave TX 78738

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Masonwood West - the fight begins

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The proposed 1600 home development on Hamilton Pool Road at the Hatchett Ranch is going to be known as Masonwood West - and is about to encounter its first organized resistance.

 

Austin based developer Jim Meredith's Masonwood company would be undertaking their biggest project yet, doubling the number of homes on the stretch of HPR between 71 and 12.  There is also a commercial element on HPR and a school site and some multi family or senior living components. No school is currently planned by LTISD looking out through 2020. The development is planned to take 10 years to complete.

 

The key issues are:

  1. Water availability
  2. Traffic on HPR
  3. Potential pollution of Little Rocky Creek
  4. School capacity in LTISD

 

Resistance is coming out of the three adjacent developments - Rocky Creek (where your BeeCaveBee.com Editor lives, for the purposes of disclosure), Belvedere and Destiny Hills.

 

Their platform is being developed at the cleverly named web site www.hprmatters.com.

 

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Last one in locks the door, right?
VOTES:2
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Not at all. Most opposed are not opposed to development but instead want responsible development.
VOTES:2
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Like you said, "most are not opposed to development" but some of these folks are opposed to ANY development and they are the ones organizing the opposition using misinformation.
VOTES:1
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Like what misinformation? Please share because all of the available information suggests truth, not misinformation.
VOTES:1
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If they want a different development than Masonwood they should just buy the land.
VOTES:0
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The proposed subdivision sits atop the Trinity Aquifer and the wastewater runoff will threaten Little Barton Creek and more possibly Little Rocky Creek. Proposing to build 1600 homes built on less than 300 acres is insane, absolutely insane.

Editor - the proposed plan is on 850 acres, we are told.
VOTES:0
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Yes. 850 total acres but the lots total 291 acres. The rest is roads, a few small parks, amenities center, potential school (who pays?), drip fields, setbacks, water storage, and wastewater treatment facility.
VOTES:-2
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So 2/3 of the development is open space ?
VOTES:-1
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The plan shows drip fields rather than spray fields. In drip fields the irrigation lines are buried 6 inches below the surface and there is no runoff. Rocky Creek has spray fields, and those can have runoff.
VOTES:-3
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Is HEB going in this project or the one next to Belvedere, across from Rocky Creek?
VOTES:-1
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Looks like the HEB is going in across from Rocky Creek, next to the new fire station.
VOTES:2
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Where did you find this information at? Are there plans to build a new fire station, and when?
VOTES:2
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You provided the WRONG property. The parcel donated is propaccess.traviscad.org/Map/View/Map/1/109957/2013 (Match the parcel acreage to the grant in the Travis County records search).
VOTES:1
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The person posting about HEB on HPR is trying to divert attention and stir the proverbial pot. None of the land owners across from Rocky Creek support such development and the fire station is eventually going in on land ESD #6 already owns (which is a site not big enough for an HEB if anyone is thinking along those lines.
VOTES:1
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Why did HEB request a traffic control at Rocky Creek Blvd and RM3238?
VOTES:0
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And your source for that is...?
VOTES:0
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Provide a source document....
VOTES:0
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There is no reason for HEB to cannibalize their own customer base when there is one on 71 in Bee Cave and another just east of 12 on 290 in Dripping Springs. Nice try at the red herring.
VOTES:0
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HEB builds out based on the residential rooftops in the area. They try to buy land well in advance.

impactnews.com/austin-metro/lake-travis-...e-hills-development/
VOTES:0
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Water is the biggest issue. We need a moratorium on building in this area until we can solve the water situation. Linda Wiles, Lakeway.
VOTES:10
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What water situation? You mean sending all the water downstream to grow St Augustine turf for people's lawns?
VOTES:-1
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absolutely! What will it take for everyone to believe that we're running out of water? Turn the tap & NOTHING comes out?
VOTES:1
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I'd love to see an Heb go out there in the next 6 years, and an expansion of Hamilton Pool Road to 4 lanes, maybe if Deome's outer loop proposal get's the go ahead, growth would be expected out near Belvidere, Rocky Creek etc. If Bee Cave annexes Belvidere, Rocky Creek or Masonwood West, or continues to grow at rapid pace from now to 2023, the population would climb over 10,000 inhabitants.
VOTES:-6
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Rocky Creek, Belvedere, and Masonwood West could form their own city.
VOTES:0
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With Rocky Creek's MUD there is no way anyone will annex it anytime in the near future. Once the MUD is significantly paid off it becomes a proposition for someone but not Bee Cave. For Bee Cave to annex they would to continue annexing along 71 which sits between Lakeway to the North and much of an Austin ETJ to the south. They would then have to go downard around the Hatch Tract and then continue down HPR to Rocky Creek, Belvedere and beyond to Hays County line (Assuming they can even extend that way since they cannot annex along TX 71 without permission of the state since they would have to assume responsibility for TX 71 as well. For those two subdivisions it is most likely that Austin annexes (after annexing the ETJ which then expands their ETJ again) or it remains unincorporated Travis County. Long shots are a new municipality is formed or Dripping Springs annexes across Hays county line.
VOTES:0
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All the concerns noted are valid, but in my opinion, water is the most critical. We have a water crisis already, we just haven't all realized it yet.
VOTES:7
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Do you realize that the Bee Cave water system leaks more water than this project will use.
VOTES:-2
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Can you cite a reference for this claim? I'd like to investigate this if your claim has any merit.
VOTES:0
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The hprmatters.com site has the minutes from the WTCPUA's May 23 2013 meeting where the subject is discussed. 19% system leakage.
VOTES:0
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You cited a document that demonstrates the system was running at 4% above "typical" loss for for a groundwater system. Can you provide anything more than conjecture to make the leap from a [likely temporary) loss being greater than that which is requested for Masonwood's proposed development?
VOTES:0
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let's do the math ...
19% of 12mgpd = 2.3mgpd.
Masonwood West = 2mgpd
VOTES:0
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Except when you account for average water loss of 15% for a water service company you're looking at a .3 mgpd loss above normal operating levels while Masonwood West's consumption (using your figure) is 2mgpd higher. It's always best to compare apples to apples.
VOTES:0
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2.3Mgpd is 2.3Mgpd.
VOTES:0
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Thank you very much.
VOTES:0
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I see traffic as an equal concern. Our family lives farther out on HPR, and almost every week one of has to dodge another car crossing the center line. It's sad that the loss of wildlife habitat will continue, not to mention more mangled deer in the roads. It's the density of this development that disturbs me. I know growth is inevitable, but this is overkill at the expense of safety and natural resources.
VOTES:6
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Gene Lowenthal wrote on 10/22/04:

Yesterday some of us got to hear a presentation from TxDot. Part of what they do is integrate population planning studies into a growth projection for various areas, and then translate that into expected burdens on various roads.

We got an earful of what would happen in our area over the next 25 years if the only forces at work were market forces. Daily car trips on 71 where it crosses 620 would increase from 40,000 today to 106,000 in 2030 - about as much as MoPac handles today. They figure that the eastern portion of 71 will need to be a six-lane expressway by that time.

The eastern stretch of Hamilton Pool Road would grow from 6500 trips per day to 20,000 trips by 2030 according to their studies. At some point, they say, HPR will need to be widened to 4 lanes and maybe straightened to accommodate such a load.
VOTES:0
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When is TxDot widening the road?
VOTES:0
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What about prohibiting lawns with grass? Put in dirt and native plants/cacti that don't need much water. Conserve!
VOTES:3
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The county requires enough landscaping to combat storm water floods.
VOTES:0
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There are plenty of natives that can accomplish this. Thirsty lawns and exotics are what should be avoided. Hopefully the county takes this into consideration, and doesn't just say "landscaping".
VOTES:1
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This is insane: water shortages, dangerous road capacity issue on HPR, major school over crowding . . . . and now some insane city council members in Bee Cave are going to allow 1,600 homes on 260 acres. In addition, there are virtually no building standard minimums for these homes - anything goes. Please know this, Bee Cave simply wants the permit revenue, sales tax, and property tax so they can grow their little kingdom while destroying the hill country. I am not opposed to the development, only opposed to the ridiculous high density that now exists as drawn.
VOTES:-3
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They pinned their future revenue to Simon properties. On the one hand, they now need to diversity their revenue stream. On the other hand, the appeal of these sort of developments is drying up fast. Sunset Valley sold their soul similarly, and now they're struggling.
VOTES:0
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The WTCPUA needs to be consistent. Since the HPR water line was emplaced each development was contractually required to adhere to a 15% impervious cover restriction. This includes Rocky Creek, Madrone Ranch, and Belvedere. These contracts are public record. Furtheremore, when the LCRA decided to go through with the water line they specifically resolved, in writing, to ensure the FWS measures were adhered to as well.
VOTES:3
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What about Deer Creek and Bella Colinas?
VOTES:1
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Deer Creek Ranch was already in platted and in existence well before the MOU. As for Bella Colinas it's a fair question that merits further inquiry.
VOTES:0
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I don't understand how the City of Bee Cave or the WTCPUA can approve Bella Colinas and then turn around and oppose Masonwood West unless they just want to stall the project until they can annex the land and collect the fees.
VOTES:0
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Anonymous wrote:
. . . . and now some insane city council members in Bee Cave are going to allow 1,600 homes on 260 acres..

The City of Bee Cave is not the approval for this hyper-dense development. But they can have some input to the WTCPUA (who provides water availability) and the Travis County (who then would have to approve it).

You're right to be upset and you should show up at the Bee Cave City Council Meeting to tell them about it.
VOTES:3
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Where is the dedicated county park land inside Rocky Creek?
VOTES:0
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300 Acres of dedicated open space with a build out of over five miles of walking trails. It more than meets the requirements of Travis County.
VOTES:2
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Again, where is the DEDICATED TRAVIS COUNTY PARK inside Rocky Creek?
VOTES:2
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Same place as the county park inside Belvedere, down the road at Reimers.
VOTES:1
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You mean where they spray the sewer water?
VOTES:1
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The "insane" city council members are not allowing anything. This development is not in the city of Bee Cave nor in it's ETJ. It is located in the jurisdiction of Travis County. Check your facts before you throw out insults.
VOTES:3
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Isn't the problem really, that other people have found your little shangrila, and now you may have to share it with others!
Hey, I know! maybe you can find something like the Golden cheeked warbler to give you environmental protection from those nasty interlopers.
BTW, weren't you at one time, one of those? Weren't we all?
VOTES:0
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It was because of the protections against development (density and buffers) that we chose to move off Hamilton Pool Road. Otherwise we could have chosen Falconhead, Sweetwater or any other number of subdivisions off a major highway (TX 71) or in a city (Bee Cave or Lakeway). Many people did their due diligence and now the PUA conveniently removes the HPR restrictions that preented Masonwoods from developing.
VOTES:0
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You sound like one of those people who buy a house close to an airport and then complain about the noise when the flight path changes.
VOTES:0
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Actually sounds like someone who did their research and there was no airport and then they decided to put one in. Totally different. It's not even an apt analogy.
Anonymous wrote:
You sound like one of those people who buy a house close to an airport and then complain about the noise when the flight path changes.
VOTES:0
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Would this require a second LTISD high school if Spicewood/and Hamilton Pool get fully developed?
VOTES:1
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CMD, the sarcasm and rudeness of your posts do nothing to further civil dialogue. Our family bought acreage on HPR 25 years ago when almost all of the residents lived on large acreage parcels. When West Cave and Saddletree went in, the character of the area was retained because of the large size of the lots. We never anticipated the traffic and the dangers we would face on our road as the density of building increased and the road was not improved. Yes, we moved here for country living and not super dense communities that change the character of our "shangri-la", as you put it. Of course, change is inevitable, but it should be responsible change.
VOTES:0
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They aren't. It's not in the budget nor is it in the long term CAMPO plan. The only ones who benefit from a four lane road are the developers (e.g. Masonwood and the Peacock Ranch property that has been for sale for a while now).
Anonymous wrote:
When is TxDot widening the road?
VOTES:0
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CMD may mean Chief of Masonwood Development, or at least it certainly seems so.
CMD wrote:
Isn't the problem really, that other people have found your little shangrila, and now you may have to share it with others!
Hey, I know! maybe you can find something like the Golden cheeked warbler to give you environmental protection from those nasty interlopers.
BTW, weren't you at one time, one of those? Weren't we all?
VOTES:3
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The point is that the PUA loses 2Mgpd whether they serve Masonwood or not. By serving Masonwood they then have to serve up an ADDITIONAL 2.3Mgpd so the loss compared Masonwood's projected needs would be.3Mgpd.
Anonymous wrote:
2.3Mgpd is 2.3Mgpd.
VOTES:0
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Can we just decrease the amount of homes planned? This neighborhood should be built like the neighborhood Belvidere, which is west of this proposed development. This plan should contain lots with vast acres of land. Hamilton Pool is meant for land opportunity, let's keep the large developments along the I-35 corridor. If they develop tracts of land out towards spicewood, People are going to want to own tons of land. I feel more comfortable with a community like belvidere, where the houses sit on acre lots.
VOTES:0

 

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